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Book Reviews

Competition: Win a copy of No More Bingo Dresses by Rosie O'Hara

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There's still time to enter this competition...

Breast cancer is one of the toughest thing any woman can go through. But often, rightly or wrongly, the emotional impact is overshadowed by the physical side effects.

Rosie O'Hara is a woman who has gone through breast cancer, and come out the other side with a positive attitude. She attributes this to NLP (Neuro-linguistic programming), and has written a book - No More Bingo Dresses, describing her journey.

Rosie's frank and honest story is inspiring and uplifting, and will hopefully help other breast cancer sufferers.

Rosie's publisher MX Publishing has kindly given us 10 copies of Rosie's book to give away to Dollymix readers.

To enter, just click here and enter your details. Terms and Conditions can be found below.


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Posted by Emma Cossey on June 23, 2011 9:33 AM in Book Reviews| Competitions & Give-Aways
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Competitions & Give-Aways

Competition: Win a copy of No More Bingo Dresses by Rosie O'Hara

No_More_Bingo_Dresses.jpgBreast cancer is one of the toughest thing any woman can go through. But often, rightly or wrongly, the emotional impact is overshadowed by the physical side effects. 

Rosie O'Hara is a woman who has gone through breast cancer, and come out the other side with a positive attitude. She attributes this to NLP (Neuro-linguistic programming), and has written a book - No More Bingo Dresses, describing her journey.

Rosie's frank and honest story is inspiring and uplifting, and will hopefully help other breast cancer sufferers.

Rosie's publisher MX Publishing has kindly given us 10 copies of Rosie's book to give away to Dollymix readers. 

To enter, just click here and enter your details. Terms and Conditions can be found below. 



Continue reading >>

Posted by Emma Cossey on May 19, 2011 2:30 PM in Book Reviews| Competitions & Give-Aways
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Book Reviews

Review: The Diva Doctine

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You might have heard of Patricia Davis from her blog post "From an Older Woman to a Younger One", which went viral and was even featured in a magazine or two during late 2010.

The blog post, as the title would suggest, features Patricia's advice to young women, entirely based on her own fifty years of experience. Everything from body confidence to friendships was covered in her list of 16 things she wished young women knew. The post was so popular that a book was commissioned, to expand on her 16 Universal Principles.

I've just finished reading the ebook, and it's a refreshing change from the usual 'self-help' style or confidence books. I love that it's all based on personal experience, and Patricia is keen to offer this advice to young women in order to save them time!

Think of it as a bundle of helpful advice from your super-confident, butt-kicking aunt who has an answer for everything. It's readable, real, funny in places, heartbreaking in others and ultimately uplifting. 

Buy it, read it and get your diva on.

You can order the Diva Doctrine for your Kindle or in paperback from Amazon.

Posted by Emma Cossey on May 9, 2011 8:30 AM in Book Reviews
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Columnists

A goodbye from me

n511466435_1645561_2266.jpgIt's goodbye from me. I'm off to trundle through fashion week and review some bits and pieces in Scotland.
I've had a great time writing bits for you all and hope I've kept you a little entertained.
I'll leave you with a few bits to look out for this week.
1. House of Blue Eyes fashion week show tonight
2. The Mofo's (photographer) new book, have a look at it here
3. Desdemona Plays Pop launch at the Horse and Groom on Wednesday
4. Our March Who's Jack issue coming out on Sunday
5. Keep an eye out for new sketch show Horne and Corden
And finally if you want to keep up with us keep an eye on our blog

Hope you all have a lovely week and hopefully see you again on Jack soon!

Lu x

Posted by Louise Orcheston-Findlay on February 23, 2009 9:35 AM in Book Reviews| Celebrities| Columnists| Louise Orcheston-Findlay
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Why I love...

Why I love... Belle de Jour

bdj.jpgI think Belle de Jour is great. And not just because she included a dedication to me in a book (although that kind of thing does warm the cockles of a girl's heart).

She's funny, literary, independent, intrepid. She's also kinda cheeky - she clearly appreciates and exploits the value of titillation, and isn't afraid of courting controversy.

Long ago, before the TV series, before the book deal and before even the Guardian weblog award, BdJ and I were blogging contemporaries. So I've been reading her for almost five years. And the more I read her, the more I like her.

And I liked her quite a lot in the first place. If you'll follow me over the jump I'll tell you why.

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Alex Roumbas

Book Review: Harlot's Sauce by Patricia Volonakis Davis

patriciavolonakisdavis.jpgHarlot's Sauce is subtitled A Memoir of Food, Family, Love, Loss and Greece, and that it certainly is. What's remarkable about this memoir and sets it apart from others in a similar vein is how much Greece herself becomes a character in the story. To borrow a tagline used with some regularity these days: there were three people in her marriage. The fact that one of them was a country makes it all even more interesting to read.

Patricia met 'Gregori' and fell in love. Their cultures were different - she was American-born of Italian descent and he was Greek born and a reluctant immigrant to the States - but, on the surface of it, not wildly so. After all, Patricia and her Jewish friend Margie's home lives are already dominated by the guilt trips, family occasions and obligations inherent in their cultures when compared to those of their WASP friends Donna and Kurt.

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Posted by Alexandra Roumbas on September 11, 2008 10:03 AM in Alex Roumbas| Book Reviews| Columnists
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Picture question

What's happening to Mills & Boon?

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Celebrities

Monday news: Accidental porn, Germaine Greer, Joanna Lumley, mother trouble

accidentalporn.jpgGavin Griffiths, founder of Scarlet magazine, has a new book out. The Accidental Pornographer tells the story of how he bought the whole Erotic Review business for £1, and how the project of keeping it going would become 'a case study in heroic failure'. It seems to be what you might call a 'failure memoir' and for that reason alone probably worth a look.

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In The News...

In the broadsheets: lesbian fiction, working mums, feminism in schools

well.jpgIn a similar argument to the one pitched against women-only art galleries, The Guardian's great Julie Bindel asks whether we still need to have a section called 'lesbian fiction' and rounds up some of the classics.

The Independent's Sarah Churchwell is animated on the continuing debate about working mothers: "In most families, women must work - we just mustn't want to," underlining my belief that somewhere in all this feminist debate there's a really good book about the 21st Century's invisible protestant work ethic.

...and in The Telegraph Dr Jessica Ringrose reckons schools should teach feminism in an effort to counter negative female role models in popular culture. "Girls may do better than boys in tests, but it doesn't matter how they perform academically, they still don't get paid as much in the workplace." Yeah, you might not want to emphasise that one in the schools so much.

Book Reviews

Books: I Was Told There'd Be Cake

cakebook.jpgAnother instant pick for the Dollymix book club, "I Was Told There'd Be Cake" is a series of vignettes from one woman's life in Manhattan. You may think we've had quite enough of this kind of thing lately, but by the looks of recent reviews, I'm pretty sure you'd be wrong. Here's what Nick Lezard said in The Guardian on Saturday:


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