twitter-100.jpgThe Independent has thrown its annual hornet's nest into the Twittersphere today, as it reveals its 100 most follow-worthy Twitter accounts for 2012. Any such list is bound to be controversial, being exclusive by nature and a little to prescriptive for some. But what we couldn't help noticing here at Dollymix is how few women are represented in the list.

This is definitely cause for concern when recent studies such as this one have revealed what most of us know to be true already: that most Twitter users are female. So what's happened here - are there really SO many more men worth following out there that they should take up more than 80% of the list?

Women included in this years Twitter 100 are as follows:

2=. Sarah Brown, Campaigner
26=. Fearne Cotton, Broadcaster
30. Davina McCall, Broadcaster
36=.Hilary Alexander, Fashion writer
56=. Sandra Hagelstam, Fashion blogger
60=. Caitlin Moran, Journalist
62=. Laura Kuenssberg, Journalist
67=. Lucy Marcus, Businesswoman
69=. Susanna Lau, Fashion blogger
73=. Louise Mensch, Politician
73=. India Knight, Journalist
80=. Jemima Khan, Writer and campaigner
84=. Hermione Way, Entrepreneur
90=. Laurie Penny, Journalist
87=. Sharon Horgan, Actress, comedian and writer
90=. Sasha Wilkins, Lifestyle and fashion blogger
97=. Sarah Millican, Comedian
100. Sian Meades, Lifestyle blogger

There are two many influential female members of the Twitterati to name who I would have like to see on this list: Feminist comedian and campaigner Kate Smurthwaite would have been one of them; the actress Rebecca Front another. It's probably fitting that I've picked out two comedians here as there are only two among the women listed while fashion bloggers and writers seem to be over-represented. There are ten comedians among the men.

Don't get me wrong, there were some excellent choices made here of both male and female tweeters, and I'd be the last to quibble over the inclusion of David Mitchell, Bill Bailey or Tim Berners-Lee (who's kind of a shoo-in given his status as God of the Internet). But it seems that the judges took a bit of a narrow view on who to include from some sectors in particular.